Bordeaux En Primeur 2021

ANDREW CAILLARD MW

– INTERNATIONAL SERIES –

BORDEAUX EN PRIMEUR 2021

Powered by

1 About the Author Andrew Caillard MW began his wine career in Bordeaux in 1979 and worked as stagaire at Ch Paveil de Luze and with Alfred de Luze et Fils on the Qua Chartrons. As a wine auctioneer in Sydney he spent over 35 years handling Grand Cru Classé wines. Since 2002, he has travelled to Bordeaux regularly to assess the vintage, engage with vignerons and negociants and provide expert advice to buying teams in Australia. This ejourna is Andrew Caillard’s first published repor on Bordeaux Primeurs to be circulated in the public arena. 9 10 10

CONTENTS

2021 – THE VIGNERONS VINTAGE

Saint-Estèphe

Pauillac

Saint-Julien

Margaux

10 10 10 11 11 12

Pessac-Léognan

Saint-Émilion

Pomerol

Sauternes–Barsac Bordeaux Blanc Sec

TASTING NOTES

13

Fountain on Place de la Bourse, Bordeaux

2021 – THE VIGNERONS VINTAGE The 2021 vintage will always be seen in the afterglow of the brilliant 2018, 2019 and 2020 vintages. After a rare trifecta, such extraordinary luck was bound to run out. Wine business during the pandemic has never been so good for many, but reflecting the stock markets around the world, Bordeaux is about to expect a correction of sorts. But rather than a nasty shock, the 2021 vintage should represent a soft landing. Although it will always be overshadowed by greater vintages, the wines are much better than anyone was prepared to predict. Having tasted through many important châteaux, the quality is generally excellent. If framed against the traditional Bordeaux vintages of the 1970s, 1980s and even the 1990s, the wine styles and sub-regional characters of the 2021 are both recognisable and impactful. With another year of oak maturation, many of the wines will develop into beautiful and classic clarets. The story of the growing season inevitably underpins the reputation of every vintage. The worst frosts in a century, combined with cool, wet conditions and outbreaks of mildew, set a dramatic scene. But there were periods of warm sunshine and dry weather, particularly in autumn, leading up to vintage. Vineyard site characteristics, vine age and management techniques also contributed to the quality of the 2021 vintage. Technology, timing, wisdom and empathy profoundly determined outcomes. This was an important year for Bordeaux, because adversity was a shared experience. It was a COVID-forced stay-at-home growing season where vignerons and their workers interacted in a more intimate way. Many château owners and negociants described 2021 as “The Year of the Vigneron.” But the vineyard and winery workers were the true heroes. Although 2021 can never be described as a great year in the true sense, the quality of the wines is often excellent, reflecting care, attention to detail and teamwork. This is very much a retro-modern vintage, where a cool growing season, technology and relentlessly hard and meticulous work resulted in something special. Nonetheless, I doubt whether the 2021 Bordeaux will be much of an investment year, and anyone participating in the forthcoming en primeur campaign should be aware that this type of vintage will not really appeal to investor types. But I would imagine many wine collectors will dip their toes in. The

Château Latour, Bordeaux

Bordeaux 2022

1

wines are genuinely very good and offer another facet to the Bordeaux experience. For Australians, en primeur is the best way to buy Bordeaux, because it guarantees allocations, the prices are generally advantageous, and it’s the nearest thing to an ex-châteaux delivery. Also, buying in sixes should promise delivery in an original branded timber case. Many of the 2021s will turn out to be classics. Although the alcohols are relatively modest (as low as 12%, mostly around 13%, but as high as 14.5%!), the tannin structures play an essential role in the overall presence and identity of the vintage. They often fill out the mid-palate and lengthen the flavours to the finish. The fruit is more juicy than sweet, but the concentration is generally very good. With further age, the elements will fold into each other, allowing more richness, volume and complexity to develop. Cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc (particularly on the Right Bank) performed extremely well, but although some reports suggest merlot universally struggled, there are many examples of merlot-dominant wines that are successful.

and women between 3 a.m. and 5 a.m. to deploy candles and wind machines on the worst frost mornings. This effort saw the temperature in vineyards raised by as much as 2°C and serious damage avoided. Mobile wind machines and helicopters have been used for quite a while now, but in recent years more châteaux have been buying computer-controlled gas-heated wind machines to circulate the air and raise temperatures. The threat of frost has become one of the key worries of vignerons. I can’t ever remember seeing so many wind machines lying about and ready for deployment while travelling around the Left and Right Banks this April (2022). There is a general feeling that weather patterns are more unpredictable than ever and that technology, machine learning and sustainable practices will play an increasingly important role in the future. The 2021 growing season is not even across the Bordeaux region. Oceanic weather has a tendency to fluctuate, causing contrasting climatic conditions. For instance, while many vineyards were exposed to the black frosts of 6th–8th April, more than a few châteaux avoided the disaster altogether. Ch Pontet Canet, Ch Montrose, Ch d’Issan and others exposed to the warming effect of Gironde Estuary were spared. Ch Troplong Mondot’s elevated vineyards in Saint-Émilion experienced normal yields. Yet at nearby Ch Quinault L’Enclos, early bud burst and stagnant air (promoted by a walled environment) led to half of its crop lost overnight. Nature can be cruel.

“A vintage of moderation and harmony” Thomas Duroux – Ch Palmer

Many of the very top châteaux have pulled rabbits out of the hat this year. This reflects a general philosophy of “the wine coming first.” This was not a year to listen to accountants. The best wines of the vintage, therefore, are invariably linked to the best resourced and intuitive winemaking teams. Although the location and aspect of vineyard sites were important, timing and decision making were also crucial. Hence, there is no obvious Left Bank or Right Bank trend in terms of who produced the better wines. Although cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc performed extremely well, merlot – with its greater vulnerability to poor weather – needed a lot of attention in the vineyard. General work duties included secondary shoot removal, leaf plucking, green harvesting and hedging to achieve the quality of grapes desired. All of this was done with special spacing rules to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. Vineyard workers, used to a 35-hour week, rose to the challenges of the season and did their bit from early morning frost fighting to weekend vineyard work. In Pomerol, the Mouiex family were assisted by 48 men

Horse plowing the soil in the village vineyard, Château Canon,Parcelle © Château Canon, Photo Brice Braastard.

2

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

3

Although the frosts created mayhem and panic, other great challenges were faced during the cool growing season resulting in further crop losses. Although rainfall was generally average (believe it or not) and temperatures only lower by around 1°C (compared to the three previous vintages), it was the pattern of wet weather that really challenged vignerons. It was heavy rainfall in May (102mm) and June (166mm!) that made a difference. Usually, these two months are relatively dry, with no more than 60mm of rain during the same period. Vigorous growth was experienced throughout the region during a warm late spring and early June. A torrential storm on June 19th led to significantly humid conditions and disease pressure. Outbreaks of mildew were inevitable. From the outset, vignerons were on a high vigilance/ monitoring routine. Regular but prudent spraying of Bordeaux mixture (light copper-based) mitigated the spread of disease. Biodynamic producers, including Ch Pontet Canet in Pauillac or Ch Smith Haut Lafitte in Pessac-Léognan, employed natural preparations including horsetail herbal infusions and willow and alder decoctions, etc. This approach, if it proves to work well, will become more ever-present in Bordeaux. There is definitely a strong move towards sustainable practices and new ways of working. These mildew outbreaks caused great concern throughout the growing season. Typically, the downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola attacks young shoots and forms “oil spots” on leaves. It is particularly virulent in cooler wet regions. A white downy “sporulation” accompanies these yellow blotches, causing the leaves to fall off and die, leaving the clusters of grapes exposed to the sun. The disease prevents the grapes from ripening and can create 100% crop losses in vineyards if the vines are not treated. Although budburst was relatively early, the cold weather in July (the coldest in 25 years) also delayed ripening. For a while, there were worrying signs that the vintage could be a write-off. The merlot grapes in many vineyards were also badly damaged by rain (causing coulure and millerandage). By mid-August, mostly dry summer conditions prevailed across the Bordeaux region during veraison (when the berries change colour).

Although rains were forecast in September and October, they were minimal. All the same, some vignerons picked earlier to avoid economic risk, but those who held out – like Ch Figeac – were rewarded by dry, warm weather and further ripening of the fruit and tannins. This made a crucial difference. The very best wines of the vintage are related to the maturity of phenolics (pips and skins). According to a story told by Pierre-Olivier Clouet of Ch Cheval Blanc, the great oenology professor Émile Peynaud observed that merlot and cabernet performed differently in the rain, merlot like a strawberry and cabernet like an apple. This analogy largely explains the challenge of the season and why many of the very top Saint-Émilions comprise unusually large proportions of cabernet franc in their blends. The threat of botrytis and more mayhem forced many vignerons to pick merlot a little earlier than expected. At Ch Palmer, the yields were modest, but the grapes were healthy; the tannins and fruit quality are excellent. At harvest time, it was experience (Ch Ducru Beaucaillou has been using the same picking team for 30 years), vigilance and technology that determined the final outcome of the growing season. Sorting and optical sorting machines – sometimes both in the vineyard and at the crusher – weeded out underripe or damaged berries. Some estates, like Ch Cheval

4

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

5

Pomerol’s rising star – Château Séraphine

Blanc, now use densimetric sorters. The grape berries are moved through a “sugared” water bath, which is set at a certain density. While the ripe berries sink to the bottom, underripe berries and MOG float to the top. These machines have been a useful weapon in keeping mildew-affected material, shot and sun-burned berries out of the vinifications. Investment in winery technology and new cellars in Bordeaux also reflects an enormous effort in improving the handling of the vintage intake and developing more precise plot-by-plot vinifications. Over the last 10 years and more, there have been extraordinary building works throughout the region. Winemakers are now better armed to respond to every vintage scenario. In 2021 Ch Figeac inaugurated its superb new spanking-clean gravity-flow winery and the results of its first vintage are spectacular. Pessac-Léognan’s Ch Haut Bailly has now completed its beautiful new rotunda-like winery, which sits in the landscape like a mounded garden. Ch Cheval Blanc has a similar rooftop garden landscape. Both wineries are symbols of sustainable practices, precision winemaking and ambition. Neither overshadow or dominate the original buildings, which can’t be said of Ch Lynch Bages’ strikingly new post- modern glass-house winery, which has been in production since 2020 but was finally inaugurated in April this year. The cool season and difficulty of some plots to achieve ripeness resulted in many châteaux employing chaptalisation, especially on the Left Bank and cooler sites on the Right Bank. Most producers were extremely judicious, and there were few, if any, wines that showed any imbalance. The use of saignée was also employed by some châteaux to build more volume. This practice is a useful tool in cooler years and, if done well, can improve complexity and richness in the wine. Ch Margaux and Ch Haut-Brion used this technique with a few parcels in 2021, and the results are excellent. Of particular note is the increasing use of large oak formats and amphora during the maturation period. For centuries Bordeaux has been famous for employing 225L barriques. Although these are still commonplace, many châteaux are experimenting with 300L hogsheads and foudres (large wooden vats of various sizes). Although Ch Pontet- Canet, a leading protagonist of sustainable and biodynamic agriculture, has been using amphorae for years, more and more vignerons seem

Buy from wineries.

Henschke

Keyneton SA 5353 Cellar Door

View

Barossa Boy

Tanunda SA 5352 Cellar Door

View

Gibson Wines

Light Pass SA 5355 Cellar Door

View

6

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

7

Saint-Estèphe This was a particularly successful year for many producers. Ch Cos d’Estournel, Ch Montrose, Ch Calon-Ségur, Ch Phélan Ségur, Ch Lafon- Rochet and Ch Tronquoy-Lalande were top performers. The wines show very good density and tannin richness. Although possessing only moderate, sometimes lowish alcohols, the structures are amazing. It will be fascinating to watch the development of the wines. I tasted many of the 2021 Grand Cru Classé wines at the Cité du Vin in Bordeaux (hosted by the Union des Grand Crus) and during the primeur week at various châteaux on the Left and Right Banks during late April 2022. It was great to see the international media and wine trade re-engaged with Bordeaux once again. Nonetheless, the task of tasting through the catalogue of Grand Cru Classé producers is increasingly difficult, as more and more châteaux insist the wines be tasted at their cellars. Although it is always best this way, it means more planning, more appointments, more driving and more chances of a traffic infringement! will increasingly reinforce reputations and drive fine wine consumer support. The impressive cellars at Ch Haut Bailly, for instance, highlight its sustainable values, sense of purpose, and ambitions.

“Whatever the terroir, the monitoring and anticipation had to be irreproachable. Unceasing watchfulness, omnipresence and absolute precision were required, from the moment the vines came out of their dormant period until the moment the wines were put into barrels” Jean Hubert Delon propriétaire Ch Léoville-Las Cases and Ch Nénin. Another trend is an increasing disconnect between established/ official hierarchies and market sentiment. The Saint-Émilion Classification, first introduced in 1953, has been embroiled in controversy for a long time with claims and counterclaims. Ch Angelus, Ch Cheval Blanc and to be experimenting with these classical vessels. Ch La Dominique, Ch Angludet, Clos Fourtet and Ch Trottevieille are examples. Other producers, like Ch Pétrus, are taking extra care to prevent over- extraction of new oak flavours by repeat-washing their barriques before maturation. (This particular practice was once commonplace, but became unfashionable during the 1970s, when the taste of new oak became popular. By the mid-2000s a more sotto voce approach began to take hold, and now winemakers are returning to the old ways.) All of these maturation techniques highlight a wish to optimise the transparency and identity of the vineyard. This trend, I think, will continue, regardless of vintage conditions in the future. Ch Ausone have recently dropped out of the Classification for various reasons. The 1855 Classification continues to play a historic influence over perceptions, but even so there are estates that have improved their standings over the years. Pomerol has sensibly never had a classification, and this has allowed the market to sort out the best estates. There is generally a correlation between investment and quality. While vineyard site is a key factor, improving technology and smart winemaking philosophies are bringing new perceptions. Sustainable credentials, inclusiveness, and a track record for quality, rather than entitled rankings,

8

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022 Château Cos d’Estournel

9

Pauillac Blackcurrant aromas, fine-grained tannins, mid-palate richness and cedar complexity feature in many of the wines. The first growths performed extremely well, with Ch Latour slightly ahead of the pack. Nonetheless, both Ch Mouton Rothschild and Ch Lafite Rothschild are exemplary wines, showing definition and stature. I particularly liked Ch Batailley, Ch Grand-Puy-Lacoste, Ch Pichon Comtesse de Lalande, Ch Pichon Baron, Ch Pontet-Canet and Ch d’Armailhac. Saint-Julien Classical styles, many with blackcurrant aromas, dark chocolate/ espresso notes and vigorous/ animated textures. The wines are a touch more phenolic than Pauillac, but the grippiness/ firmness give the wine presence and carry the flavours to the finish. Ch Gruaud-Larose was a standout wine this year. Ch Ducru-Beaucaillou, Ch Léoville-Las Cases, Clos de Marquis, Ch Léoville-Barton and Ch Beychevelle all made stylish wines. Alcohols mostly hovered around 12.5–13.3%. Margaux Gentle wines with very good density and suppleness. Ch Margaux, Pavillon Rouge, Ch Palmer, Alter Ego de Palmer and Ch Rauzan-Ségla were defining wines of the sub region. Pessac-Léognan Inky dense wines with dark cherry/ elderberry fruits and vigorous tannins. Ch Haut-Brion, Ch La Mission Haut-Brion, La Clarté de Ch Haut-Brion, Ch Haut-Bailly and Ch Smith Haut Lafitte are all strong performers. Saint-Émilion Ch Angelus, Ch Ausone, Ch Cheval Blanc, Ch Figeac, Ch Belair Monange and Ch Trottevieille all show outstanding potential. Their pure fruit definition, chalky structures and precision are impressive. Ch Tertre

Roteboeuf is idiosyncratic and beautiful. Ch Canon, Ch La Dominique, Ch Troplong Lalande and Ch Pavie Macquin are very classical in style. Ch Pavie continues to run its own race. The structure is extremely assertive, but over time the tannins may settle down. Pomerol Rigorous management led to some very smart wines being produced in Pomerol. Ch Petrus, Ch Lafleur, Vieux Château Certan, La Conseillante. L’if, Le Pin and Ch L’Évangile showed great promise. The Lilliputian estate Ch Séraphine, Ch Gazin and Ch Le Bon Pasteur also produced exemplary vintages. Sauternes–Barsac I didn’t travel down to Sauternes this year. But having tasted several examples at the media tasting in Bordeaux, I think it is generally quite an average year. Botrytis did arrive, but many wines were based on the first selection. Ch Suduiraut cropped at only 0.9hl/ha, which shows the dismal economic results. Ch Coutet and Ch La Tour Blanche are excellent.

10

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

11

First light in Pomerol

Tasting Notes

Bordeaux Blanc Sec The wines are generally very aromatic and refreshing with lovely fruit definition, richness and mineral length. Ch Haut-Brion Blanc, Ch La Mission Haut-Brion Blanc and Domaine de Chevalier Blanc, all from Pessac-Léognan were all very good. But watch out for the prices! Having observed Bordeaux for many years now, I think the 2021 vintage is one of the most fascinating. The complexities of the growing season, the surprising quality of the wines, market sentiment, possible media friction and the geo-political scene all conspire to make this year’s primeur campaign unpredictable. This will inevitably lead to controversy and polarised opinions. But for those who love Bordeaux, 2021 will be remembered as a classic year and many of the wines will develop beautifully.

Saint-Estèphe

Château Cos d’Estournel 96–97 Deep crimson. Intense dark chocolate, blackcurrant brambly aromas with inky graphite notes. Superbly concentrated wine with deep-set pure blackcurrant, blackberry confit fruits, fine graphite/ vigorous textures, superb mid-palate density and underlying malty/ spicy oak. Very chocolaty with a leafy tannin plume. Superb fruit definition, complexity and precision. 64% cabernet sauvignon, 30% merlot, 4% cabernet franc, 2% petit verdot. 55% new French oak barriques. 12.74% alc Château Montrose 96–97 Deep colour. Classic blackcurrant cedar mocha aromas with herb garden/ sage notes. Ample blackberry, cassis, briary fruits, fine dense velvety/chocolaty textures and plentiful cedar roasted chestnut notes. Very pure fruited with superb tannin richness, precision and vigour. Finishes al dente firm and bittersweet with saturated dark berry fruits. Lovely density and complexity – should develop very well. 62% cabernet sauvignon, 31% merlot, 6% cabernet franc, 1% petit verdot. Château Calon-Ségur 95–96 Medium-deep crimson. Intense dark berry, blackcurrant elderberry dark chocolate aromas. Blackberry, malt, nutmeg vanilla notes and fine grainy al dente tannins. Finishes firm with bittersweet notes. Very impressive concentration and mineral length – a sleeping beauty. 81% cabernet sauvignon, 11% cabernet franc, 7% merlot, 1% petit verdot. 20 months in 100% new French oak barriques. Les Pagodes de Cos (de Château Cos d’Estournel) 95–96 Deep crimson. Dark plum blackcurrant wax polish praline aromas. Generous dark berry/ sweet fruit flavours, fine chocolaty/ velvety textures, attractive mid-palate volume and integrated savoury/ vanilla notes before a bittersweet finish with an inky plume. Superb tannin quality and should last the distance. 25% new French oak barriques. 12.49% alc

“Drought, fears, and finally relief thanks to the fortunate late season conditions” Chateau Pontet-Canet

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

13

Château Tronquoy-Lalande 95–96 Deep crimson. Intense fragrant black cherry, strawberry, violet aromas with dark chocolate, roasted chestnut notes. Beautifully concentrated, glossy wine with lovely pure black fruits, fine plentiful graphite almost cashmere tannins and savoury chalky notes. Finishes firm, bittersweet and minerally. Masterful tannin management. 48% cabernet sauvignon, 40% merlot, 12% petit verdot. 13.3% alc Château Lafon-Rochet 94–95 Medium-deep crimson. Inky blackberry graphite aromas with herb garden, hint star anise notes. Ample bodied wine with glossy blackcurrant, blackberry fruits, plentiful velvety tannins, lovely mid-palate richness and underlying savoury oak notes. Finishes firm with minerally flavours at the finish. Very successful wine. 69% cabernet sauvignon, 26% merlot, 4% cabernet franc, 1% petit verdot. 15 months in around 50% new French oak. 12.9% alc Château Phélan Ségur 94–95 Deep crimson. Fresh fragrant blackcurrant dried rose sage aromas with vanilla notes. Well concentrated and smooth with blackcurrant vanilla flavours, lovely cedary textures, mid-palate richness and fresh long acidity. Supple and refined wine. 75% cabernet sauvignon, 21% merlot, 4% petit verdot. 18 months in 55% new French oak. 13.5% alc G d’Estournel (de Château Cos d’Estournel) 94–95 Deep crimson. Intense dark plum, blackcurrant, dark chocolate aromas with herb garden notes. Very well concentrated and chocolaty textured with ample dark plum chinotto fruits, chocolaty/ velvety tannins, spicy complexity and lovely bittersweet notes. Firm and tight. 80% merlot, 19% cabernet sauvignon, 1% cabernet franc. Amazing wine at 12.18% alc La Dame de Montrose (de Château Montrose) 93–94 Medium-deep crimson. Fragrant black cherry, blackcurrant dried rose aromas with some pastille notes. Generous supple and sweet fruited, with pure black berry/ blackcurrant pastille fruits and fine grainy hint cedary textures. Very good mid-palate richness and definition. Finishes gritty firm and minerally. 38% cabernet sauvignon, 53% merlot, 3% cabernet franc, 6% petit verdot. Le Marquis de Calon Ségur (de Château Calon-Ségur) 92–93 Medium-deep crimson. Pure dark plum, blackberry fruits with herb notes. Inky deep wine with red and blackberry fruits, chocolaty/ chalky firm textures and chinotto/ cola notes. Finishes grippy firm with attractive mineral length. Sturdy and fresh with saturated fruit. 58% merlot, 42% cabernet sauvignon. 17 months in 30% new French oak barriques.

Château Lilian Ladouys 92–93 Medium-deep crimson. Fresh raspberry blackberry mulberry fruits with savoury notes. Exuberant style with rich red and dark berry fruits, grainy cedar tannins and underlying vanilla/ chinotto flavours. Finishes chewy and long. 53% cabernet sauvignon, 40% merlot, 6% petit verdot, 1% cabernet franc. 30% new French oak. 12.93% alc Château Cos Labory 91–92 Deep crimson. Lifted elderberry dark cherry, cassis fruits with inky notes. Plentiful elderberry, dark cherry, cassis flavours, fine firm muscular tannins, attractive mid-palate viscosity. Finishes iron/ gritty firm with malty notes. 33% merlot, 60% cabernet sauvignon, 7% petit verdot. 14 months in 50% new French oak. 12.9% alc Château de Pez 91–92 Medium-deep crimson. Redcurrant, mulberry, cedar aromas with vanilla toasty toffee notes. Well focussed redcurrant, mulberry cedar flavours, attractive mid-palate density and fine sinewy/muscular tannins. Firm finish with minerally/ inky plume. 62% cabernet sauvignon, 36% merlot, 2% cabernet franc. 12 months in 30% new French oak. 13% alc Château Capbern 90–91 Medium crimson. Raspberry, redcurrant, plum fruits with savoury notes. Ripe pure redcurrant pastille, red liquorice flavours, fine graphite/ sinewy tannins and savoury oak notes. Finishes chewy and long. Some sappy leafy notes, but very good pure fruit characters, elegance and freshness. 18 months in 40% new French oak barriques. 12.8% alc La Devise de Lilian (de Château Lilian Ladouys) 89–90 Medium-deep crimson. Pure plum raspberry aromas and flavours with plentiful fine chalky tannins and some camomile notes. A very attractive buoyant style and Medium-bodied wine that finishes firm. 100% merlot. Seasoned oak. 13.11% alc

14

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

15

Pauillac

Château Batailley 94–95 Deep crimson. Intense blackcurrant, praline aromas with dark chocolate notes. Richy flavoured wine with abundant blackcurrant, blackberry fruits, fine slinky grainy tannins, attractive mid-palate density and integrated roasted chestnut notes. Finishes firm with leafy cabernet notes. Very expressive wine. 76% cabernet sauvignon, 2% cabernet franc, 20% merlot, 2% petit verdot. 18 months in 50–60% new French oak. 13% alc Carruades de Lafite (de Château Lafite Rothschild) 94–95 Medium-deep colour. Blackcurrant, raspberry praline mocha hint of violet aromas. Lovely cassis, dark chocolate flavours, classical fine- grained tannins, very good mid-palate density and mineral length. Finishes al dente/ graphite firm. 55% cabernet sauvignon, 36% merlot, 94–95 Deep colour. Cassis, dark chocolate, espresso aromas. Richly flavoured wine with blackcurrant, espresso, dark chocolate flavours, fine loose- knit chalky/grainy tannins, lovely natural density and vanilla/roasted chestnut notes. Finishes minerally and long. Very good precision and suppleness. 88% cabernet sauvignon, 12% merlot. 18 months in 70% new and 30% second-use French oak barriques. Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande 94–95 Deep crimson. Intense dark cherry, blackcurrant brambly aromas with espresso, graphite leafy notes. Richly flavoured and sturdy with ample blackcurrant blackberry fruits dense chocolaty/ chewy textures and integrated cedar oak notes. Finishes chocolaty firm with mineral graphite notes. This should age pretty well. 88% cabernet sauvignon, 2% merlot, 10% cabernet franc. 12 months in 40% new French oak. 13% alc Château Clerc Milon 93–94 Medium-deep colour. Intense black cherry, mulberry dark chocolate aromas with herb notes. Well concentrated mulberry, black cherry fruits, brambly notes and underlying savoury espresso/ mocha oak. Grainy firm finish with ample sweet fruits. A classic Pauillac style with tannins giving textural richness and lengthening the palate. 59% cabernet sauvignon, 28% merlot, 10% cabernet franc, 1.5% carmenere, 1.5% petit verdot. Château Duhart-Milon 93–94 Medium-deep colour. Fresh raspberry cassis, graphite aromas with herb garden notes. Generous and juicy with fresh pure raspberry, cassis fruits, fine slinky/ hint leafy textures and underlying savoury oak. Finishes firm and minerally. Very good density and torque. 81% cabernet sauvignon 19% merlot. 5% cabernet franc, 4% petit verdot. Château Pichon Longueville Baron

Château Latour 97–98 Deep colour. Fragrant, dark chocolate, dark cherry, blackcurrant fruits with cedar notes. Well concentrated dark chocolate blackcurrant, mocha flavours, fine grained/ graphite tannins and roasted chestnut oak flavours. Finishes al dente firm and minerally. A refined classical style with very good tannin vigour and freshness. Should age extremely well. 96% cabernet sauvignon, 4% merlot. 13.1% alc Château Mouton Rothschild 97–98 Medium-deep crimson. Lifted blackcurrant, blackberry aromas with toasty, marzipan roasted chestnut notes. Inky deep blackcurrant blackberry fruits, fine graphite/firm and a hint cedary tannins with plentiful toasty/ roasted chestnut/ vanilla notes. Finishes chocolaty firm and minerally with bittersweet notes. A very lovely wine with ample dark fruits, superb richness and energy. Should develop very well. 89% cabernet sauvignon, 10% merlot, 1% cabernet franc. Château Lafite Rothschild 96–97 Deep colour. Classical blackcurrant, blackberry, hint cedar aromas with mocha herb notes. Richly concentrated yet elegantly styled with pure blackcurrant, blackberry fruits, fine slinky/chalky dry tannins, attractive mid-palate volume, roasted chestnut, hint malt oak. Finishes grainy/ al dente firm with bittersweet notes. Impressive power, density and focus. A first wine made from almost 100% cabernet sauvignon. 96% cabernet sauvignon, 3% merlot, 1% petit verdot. Château d’Armailhac 95–96 Deep crimson. Intense blackcurrant, redcurrant, praline aromas with espresso, vanilla herb/violet notes. Firm and assertive with dense blackcurrant, dark chocolate, espresso flavours and fine chocolaty tannins. Neatly balanced wine with underlying oak and firm minerally finish. 63% cabernet sauvignon, 22% merlot, 13% cabernet franc, 2% petit verdot. 18 months in around 40% new French oak. 13% alc Château Pontet-Canet 95–96 Deep crimson. Lovely dark chocolate, blackberry, graphite aromas. Richly concentrated and voluminous dark chocolate, blackberry, blackcurrant flavours, integrated fine chocolaty/ cedary textures and savoury nuances. Beautifully balanced with very good density, mid-palate richness and vigour. 58% cabernet sauvignon, 32% merlot, 4% cabernet franc 6% petit verdot. 50% new oak, 35% amphoras, 15% 1-year old oak.

16

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

17

Château Lynch-Bages 93–94 Deep crimson. Intense blackcurrant elderberry aromas with hint praline dark cherry notes. Lovely chocolaty wine with plentiful cassis, cedar roasted chestnut notes, fine powdery touch soupy tannins and underlying cedar notes. Very good density. 67% cabernet sauvignon, 25% merlot, 3% cabernet franc, 5% petit verdot. Château Pedesclaux 93–94 Deep colour. Chinotto, bitter dark chocolate, blackcurrant aromas. Rich chocolaty palate with blackberry blackcurrant fruits, fine velvety textures, bittersweet flavours and a lovely chewy long finish. Very good density and mineral length. 64% cabernet sauvignon, 27% merlot, 3% petit verdot, 6% cabernet franc. Matured in 60% new French oak barriques. 12.97% alc Les Forts de Latour (de Château Latour) 93–94 Deep colour. Fresh blackcurrant, graphite herb garden aromas with savoury vanilla notes. Blackcurrant, blackberry fruits, sinewy firm tannins and bittersweet/chinotto notes. Finishes chalky/ grippy firm with ample dark fruits and crispy freshness. 61% cabernet sauvignon, 32.6% merlot, 6.4% petit verdot. 13% alc Les Griffons de Pichon Baron (de Château Pichon Longueville Baron) 93–94 Deep colour. Pure blackcurrant, espresso hint miso/ violet notes. Well concentrated blackcurrant, elderberry, espresso mocha, Parma violet notes, fine sinewy tannins and underlying graphite savoury flavours. Finishes firm and tight with juicy acidity at the finish. Elemental but balanced wine that will settle down. 45% cabernet sauvignon, 44% merlot, 11% petit verdot. Maturation for 18 months in 40% new and 60% second-use oak. Château Croizet-Bages 92–93 Medium-deep crimson. Inky chinotto black cherry aromas with cedar notes. Concentrated, smooth and sweet fruited with black cherry cassis fruits, fine velvety textures, some savoury vanilla toasty notes and fresh mineral acidity. Finishes chalky firm and long. 66% cabernet sauvignon, 33% merlot, 1% petit verdot. 12 months in around 50–55% new French oak. 13% alc Les Tourelles de Longueville (de Château Pichon Longueville Baron) 92–93 Medium-deep crimson. Fragrant blackcurrant pastille graphite/ cedar aromas and flavours. Vibrant juicy black fruits, fine sappy/ al dente textures and underlying savoury oak notes. Firm al dente/ brambly finish. 66% merlot, 28% cabernet sauvignon, 6% cabernet franc. 12 months maturation in 30% new and 70% second-use French oak.

Fleur de Pedesclaux (de Château Pedesclaux) 91–92 Medium-deep crimson. Fresh cassis, black cherry, wood varnish aromas. Lovely generous cassis, plum, black fruits, attractive mid-palate richness and fine cedar chewy textures. Finishes firm and minerally. 53% merlot, 39% cabernet sauvignon, 8% petit verdot. Matured in 30% new and seasoned French oak barriques. Lacoste-Borie (de Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste) 91–92 Medium-deep colour. Fresh redcurrant cedar chinotto aromas and flavours. Well concentrated palate with ample red and black fruits, roasted coffee/ espresso notes, fine cedary textures and integrated fresh acidity. Finishes firm and long. 56% cabernet sauvignon, 36% merlot, 8% cabernet franc. Moulin de Duhart (de Château Duhart-Milon) 91–92 Medium-deep crimson. Fresh redcurrant raspberry aromas with graphite notes. Lovely fresh raspberry redcurrant, cassis flavours, fine slinky/ hint al dente textures and fine crisp acidity. Very juicy and elemental but well balanced. 64% merlot, 36% cabernet sauvignon. Pauillac (de Château Latour) 91–92 Deep colour. Fresh graphite, cassis cedar aromas with hint of wax polish. Concentrated juicy cassis, blackberry brambly fruits and sinewy/ al dente tannins. Very good density and vigour with some sappy notes. 60.9% cabernet sauvignon, 28% merlot, 11.1% petit verdot. 12.9% alc Petit Mouton (de Château Mouton Rothschild 91–92 Medium-deep colour. Dark plum, blackcurrant leafy herb aromas. Supple and slinky textured with plentiful redcurrant, raspberry cassis fruits, fine lacy firm tannins and savoury oak notes before building up leafy at the finish. Some campari/ chinotto notes. Gentle loose-knit wine but lacking some power and density. 77% cabernet sauvignon, 19.5% merlot, 3% cabernet franc, 0.5% petit verdot. Château Pibran 90–91 Medium-deep crimson. Elemental elderberry, blackberry aromas with brambly notes. Juicy and tight with ample elderberry, blackberry fruits, fine sinewy/chewy tannins and underlying graphite notes. A touch sappy at the finish. 63% cabernet sauvignon, 37% merlot. 18 months maturation in 40% new and 60% second-use French oak. Lions de Batailley (de Château Batailley) 90–91 Deep crimson. Redcurrant, raspberry cassis aromas. Well concentrated supple wine with fresh red berry fruits, attractive velvety tannins, some toasty elements and pronounced acidity. Finishes chalky dry and minerally. 65% cabernet sauvignon, 5% cabernet franc, 30% merlot.

18

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

19

Saint-Julien

Château Grand-Puy Ducasse 89–90 Deep crimson. Primary elderberry, blackcurrant aromas with espresso/ mocha notes. Well concentrated elderberry, blackberry, malty flavours, fine persistent chalky al dente textures and pronounced acidity. Finishes firm and drying. 62% cabernet sauvignon, 38% merlot. 18 months in around 35% new French oak. 12.8% alc Château Lynch-Moussas 88–89 Deep crimson. Fragrant cassis herb sage aromas with graphite notes. Fresh blackcurrant, blackberry, mulberry, graphite flavours, fine chalky/ gravelly tannins and savoury oak notes. Finishes firm, almost ferruginous with sweet fruit. 72% cabernet sauvignon, 28% merlot. 18 months in up to 55% new French oak. 13% alc

Château Ducru-Beaucaillou 95–96 Deep crimson. Intense blackberry, dark chocolate, hint vanilla marzipan aromas. Sweet fruited, blackberry, dark chocolate flavours, lovely chocolaty textures. Almost plush with al dente notes. Brambly cedar finish. Impressively balanced. 98% cabernet sauvignon, 2% merlot. 18 months in 100% new French oak. 12.5% alc Château Gruaud-Larose 95–96 Deep crimson. Fresh graphite, blackcurrant aromas with praline notes. Fresh concentrated juicy dark berry blackcurrant fruits, underlying dark chocolate notes and persistent chalky/ fine-grained tannins. Very good mid-palate density and mineral length. Some savoury notes at the finish. Impressive definition and precision. A classic. 84% cabernet sauvignon, 12% merlot, 4% cabernet franc. 18–24 months in French oak. 12.5% alc Château Léoville-Las Cases 95–96 Medium-deep crimson. Blackcurrant lead-pencil cedar aromas with roasted chestnut notes. Classically structured wine with blackcurrant blackberry fruits, fine sinewy/ grainy tannins and roasted chestnut oak. Finishes muscular firm with leafy notes. Lovely precision. Fresh and voluminous but needs several years to show itself. 80% cabernet sauvignon, 15% cabernet franc, 5% merlot. Maturation in 85% new 94–95 Deep crimson. Classic blackcurrant cedar vanilla aromas with star anise notes. Blackcurrant espresso, vanilla flavours, fine-grained almost crisp tannins and plentiful mineral notes. Finishes cedar firm. Very expressive wine with attractive density, volume and attack. 57% cabernet sauvignon, 38% merlot, 3% petit verdot, 2% cabernet franc. 18 months in roughly 60% new French oak. 13% alc Château Léoville-Barton 94–95 Deep crimson. Very attractive cassis cedar aromas with inky graphite notes. Generous and supple with ample blackcurrant, blackberry fruits, fine slinky textures and underlying savoury oak complexity. Finishes al dente firm with plentiful dark fruits and mineral length. 84% cabernet sauvignon, 11% merlot, 5% cabernet franc. 18 months in around 60% new French oak. 13.1% alc French oak. 13.2% alc Château Beychevelle

20

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

21

Clos du Marquis 94–95 Medium-deep crimson. Fresh blackcurrant graphite, butterscotch, marzipan aromas. Richly concentrated blackcurrant, mulberry fruits, chewy al dente hint leafy tannins, vanilla marzipan cola notes. Finishes brambly firm. Complex, beautifully balanced and vigorous. 67% cabernet sauvignon, 19% merlot, 14% cabernet franc. Maturation in 50% new 93–94 Medium-deep crimson. Very fresh inky chinotto black cherry aromas with cedar herb notes. Inky chinotto black cherry, hint elderberry fruits, fine chalky tannins and underlying vanilla toasty, malt notes. Cedar firm finish with juicy fresh acidity. 66% cabernet sauvignon, 22% merlot, 5.5% petit verdot, 6.5% cabernet franc. 16–20 months in up to 60% new French oak. 13% alc Château Gloria 93–94 French oak. 13.46% alc Château Branaire-Ducru Medium-deep crimson. Intense dark cherry, blackberry, blackcurrant with spicy vanilla roasted walnut notes. Smooth and inky textured with ample redcurrant cassis, mocha notes, fine chewy textures, attractive mid- palate richness and long mineral acidity. Finishes firm with very good mineral length. 61% cabernet sauvignon, 19% merlot, 6% cabernet franc, 14% petit verdot. 14 months in around 40% new French oak. 13.1% alc Château Lagrange 93–94 Deep crimson. Wax polish toasty vanilla, blackcurrant elderberry aromas. Slightly oak dominant palate with toasty, mocha vanilla oak over blackcurrant, blackberry fruits and underlying fine cedary textures. Finishes firm with ample dark berry fruits and juicy acidity. Elemental but very well made wine. 84% cabernet sauvignon, 14% merlot, 2% petit verdot. 21 months in 50% new French oak. 13% alc Château Langoa Barton 92–93 Deep crimson. Fresh dark cherry, blackcurrant wax polish aromas and flavours, plentiful fine velvety firm, slightly brambly tannins, some dark chocolate/ espresso notes. Finishes firm with an inky plume. Should build more richness with age. 61% cabernet sauvignon, 36% merlot, 3% cabernet franc. 18 months in around 60% new French oak. 13% alc La Croix de Ducru Beaucaillou (de Château Ducru-Beaucaillou) 92–93 Deep crimson. Intense blackcurrant, praline, espresso vanilla aromas. Smooth dark berry fruits, fine velvetine tannins and savoury/ vanilla oak notes. Finishes chewy/cedar firm. Very good depth and vigour with bittersweet notes. 64% cabernet sauvignon, 32% merlot, 4% petit verdot. 12 months in 60% new French oak. 12.5% alc

Château Saint-Pierre 91–92 Medium-deep crimson. Dark chocolate, espresso, black olive aromas with toasty notes. Velvety textured wine with plentiful blackcurrant, chocolate flavours, brambly textures and underlying toasty vanilla notes. Finishes al dente firm with some leafy notes. 70% cabernet sauvignon, 14% merlot, 9% cabernet franc, 7% petit verdot. 14 months in roughly 50% new French oak. 13.3% alc La Petite Marquise (de Château Leoville-Las Cases) 91–92 Medium-deep colour. Blackcurrant, blackberry praline aromas. Velvetine textured wine with ample black fruits, fine grainy/ al dente firm textures and savoury oak notes. Finishes minerally. 55% cabernet sauvignon 38% merlot, 7% cabernet franc. Maturation in oak vats. 12.95% alc Le Petit Lion (de Château Leoville-Las-Cases) 91–92 Medium-deep colour. Fresh blackcurrant pastille marzipan aromas. Very sturdy wine with blackcurrant blackberry graphite notes and fine sinewy/ bittersweet tannins. Chinotto notes at the finish. 57% merlot, 40% cabernet sauvignon, 3% cabernet franc. Maturation in 40% new French oak. 13.27% alc Le Petit Ducru (de Château Ducru-Beaucaillou) 90–91 Deep crimson. Intense dark chocolate, blackberry mulberry aromas with roasted walnut notes. Dark chocolate, black cherry flavours, fine chocolaty/ brambly textures and persistent juicy fresh acidity. Finishes firm and tight with leafy notes. 80% merlot, 12% cabernet sauvignon, 8% petit verdot. 12 months in around 30% new French oak. 13% alc Château Talbot 89–90 Medium-deep crimson. Roasted chestnut, black cherry, blackcurrant aromas with tobacco leaf notes. Bittersweet palate with blackcurrant, chinotto, slightly leafy notes, fine bitter/ al dente tannins and some savoury oak notes. Finishes chalky firm. Acidity pronounced at the finish. 71% cabernet sauvignon, 24% merlot, 5% petit verdot. 15 months in around 50–60% new French oak. 12% alc

22

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

23

Margaux

Château Lascombes 93–94 Deep crimson. Intense blackcurrant, dark plum fruits with cedar/ brambly noes. Velvety smooth with attractive blackcurrant, dark plum, chinotto flavours, fine loose-knit grainy/ al dente textures and underlying vanilla oak. Builds up firm with crunchy fruit notes. Should develop very well. 55% cabernet sauvignon, 40% merlot, 5% petit verdot. 18 months in 60% new French oak. 13.5% alc Château du Tertre 93–94 Deep crimson. Intense blackcurrant, dark chocolate vanilla aromas with herb garden notes. Generously flavoured and velvety smooth with abundant dark berry fruits, fine slinky textures, lovely mid-palate richness and underlying savoury oak. Bittersweet notes at the finish. 64% cabernet sauvignon, 10% merlot, 20% cabernet franc, 6% petit verdot. 14 months in around 45% new French oak. 13% alc Château Angludet 92–93 Deep crimson. Smooth blackcurrant, blackberry fruits with vanilla, hint marzipan notes. Richly flavoured wine with ample cassis, blackberry fruits, plentiful fine chalky textures, vanilla/ ginger oak notes, attractive mid-palate viscosity and fresh mineral acidity. Nicely balanced with an inky plume at the finish. 12 months in 50% amphora and 50% French oak. 12% alc Château Desmirail 92–93 Deep crimson. Attractive blackcurrant ginger vanilla aromas with spicy notes. Well integrated wine with blackcurrant chocolaty mocha flavours, fine chalky/ grainy textures, some butterscotch notes. Finishes firm and long. Surprisingly complex and complete. 12 months in around 50% new French oak. 12.7% alc Château Marquis de Terme 92–93 Deep crimson. Intense dark chocolate, malty, dark fruit aromas.Well concentrated dark chocolate, mulberry, cassis fruits, fine loose-knit velvety textures and underlying toasty vanilla notes. Builds up firm and chocolaty at the finish. Very good density and torque. 64% cabernet sauvignon, 31% merlot, 5% petit verdot. Typically 18 months in 50% new French oak. 13% alc Château Prieuré-Lichine 92–93 Medium-deep crimson. Fresh black cherry herb chinotto aromas with leafy notes. Black cherry, blackcurrant toasty vanilla malt notes, fine chewy/ velvetine tannins and integrated crisp acidity. Generously flavoured wine with very good density. 65% cabernet sauvignon, 30% merlot, 5% petit verdot. 14 months in around 40% new French oak. 13% alc

Château Palmer 96–97 Medium-deep crimson. Perfumed dark chocolate, marzipan, roasted almond aromas with violet notes. Lovely generous dark chocolate, cassis flavours, fine chewy tannins, some chinotto, bittersweet notes and underlying roasted chestnut notes. Finishes graphite firm with inky volume. 56% merlot, 41% cabernet sauvignon, 3% petit verdot. Maturation in 50% oak barriques and 50% 30hl vats. Château Margaux 95–96 Deep colour. Dark chocolate, dark cherry, vanilla marzipan aromas. Very complex dark plums, hint panforte. Richly textured dark chocolate, dark cherry, mulberry, vanilla oak, abundant chocolaty/ graphite textures, hint black olive/ wax polish. Finishes cedar/ graphite firm. 87% cabernet sauvignon, 8% merlot, 3% cabernet franc, 2% petit verdot. Alter Ego de Palmer 94–95 Medium-deep colour. Intense blackcurrant, dark chocolate/ praline aromas. Sweet fruited blackcurrant pastille fruits, fine grainy al dente/ leafy tannins, some graphite notes and underlying savoury oak. Finishes cedary firm. 60% cabernet sauvignon, 32% merlot, 8% petit verdot. Maturation in 50% oak barriques and 50% 30hl vats. Château Rauzan-Ségla 94–95 Medium-deep crimson. Fresh blackcurrant, praline vanilla malt aromas with sage notes. Well balanced wine with ample blackcurrant, pistacho, vanilla flavours, fine loose-knit chalky tannins and well integrated linear fresh acidity. Finishes chalky firm and long. Should develop well. 75% cabernet sauvignon, 25% merlot. 18 months in 60% new French oak. 13% alc Le Pavillon Rouge 94–95 Pale colour. Bitter lemon, grapefruit aromas with verbena toasty notes. Sweet fruited wine with ample grapefruit, tonic water, leesy flavours, fine loose-knit chalky textures, some mid-palate viscosity and fresh linear acidity. Oak dominates the back palate but should settle. Attractive minerally wine with fresh chewy tobacco notes. Very tactile wine. 55% semillon, 45% sauvignon blanc. 55% new oak. 14% alc

24

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

25

Château Cantenac-Brown 91–92 Deep crimson. A little shy. Blackcurrant, smoky vanilla aromas. Intense blackcurrant pastille cedar favours, some smoky malt notes, fine brambly tannins and underlying mineral notes. Works well. 16 months in roughly 60% new French oak. Château Giscours 91–92 Deep crimson. Dark fruits, graphite, wax polish aromas. Smooth inky wine with ample cassis fruits, fine supple grainy tannins and malty/ vanilla oak complexity. Chocolaty/ leafy almost soupy finish. Still in parts. 65% cabernet sauvignon, 32% merlot, 3% petit verdot. 17 months in roughly 50% new French oak. 13.5% alc Château Labégorce 91–92 Medium-deep crimson. Oak dominant malty vanilla aromas with red cherry redcurrant, cassis, herb garden notes. Well rounded redcurrant, chinotto malty flavours, attractive inky density, and fine grainy tannins. Finishes chalky firm with juicy dark berry fruits. Typically 50% cabernet sauvignon, 45% merlot, 3% cabernet franc, 2% petit verdot. Around 12– 14 months in 40–50% new French oak. 13% alc Château Rauzan-Gassies 91–92 Medium-deep crimson. Red and dark cherry, cassis aromas with black olive herb garden notes. Medium-bodied wine with red and dark berry fruits, some black olive graphite notes, chewy tannins and toasty vanilla oak. Finishes soupy/ chocolaty firm. 78% cabernet sauvignon 22% merlot. 12 months in up to around 50% new French oak. 13% alc Château Kirwan 90–91 Medium-deep crimson. Dark cherry, cassis aromas with hint malty vanilla notes. Dark cherry, red liquorice flavours, fine bittersweet tannins and fresh linear/ mineral acidity. Malty firm finish. 73% cabernet sauvignon, 13% merlot, 8% cabernet franc, 6% petit verdot. 18 months in roughly 30% new French oak. 13% alc Château Siran 90–91 Medium-deep crimson. Wax polish, cassis, vanilla aromas with herb notes. Fresh cassis, redcurrant fruits, fine loose-knit chalky al dente textures and malt vanilla notes. Builds up brambly firm at the finish. 60% cabernet sauvignon, 28% merlot, 11% petit verdot, 1% cabernet franc. 12 months in 35% new French oak. 13% alc

Château Malescot Saint Exupéry 89–90 Medium-deep crimson. Cassis, carob hint vegemite aromas. Chocolaty palate with blackcurrant, malty flavours and fine grained/ gritty textures. Very good mid-palate richness and mineral length. 49% cabernet sauvignon, 38% merlot, 8% cabernet franc, 5% petit verdot. 12–14 months in French oak. 13% alc Château Monbrison 87–88 Deep crimson. Attractive blackcurrant, black cherry aromas with vanilla herb notes. Richly flavoured blackcurrant, black cherry fruits, fine loose- knit chalky textures, chinotto malty notes. Finishes chalky/chewy firm with bittersweet, malty notes. 70% cabernet sauvignon, 20% merlot, 7% cabernet franc, 3% petit verdot. 18 months in 30% new French oak. 13% alc.

26

The Vintage Journal – International Series

Bordeaux 2022

27

Page 1 Page 2-3 Page 4-5 Page 6-7 Page 8-9 Page 10-11 Page 12-13 Page 14-15 Page 16-17 Page 18-19 Page 20-21 Page 22-23 Page 24-25 Page 26-27 Page 28-29 Page 30-31 Page 32-33 Page 34-35 Page 36-37 Page 38-39 Page 40-41 Page 42-43 Page 44-45 Page 46-47 Page 48-49 Page 50-51 Page 52-53 Page 54-55 Page 56-57 Page 58-59 Page 60-61 Page 62

thevintagejourn.disciplemedia.com

Powered by